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FT approved by CT
05-10-2017, 08:06 PM
Post: #1
Thumbs Up FT approved by CT
Hi guys,

Just a little post to share the good words of Christian Thibaudeau about Fortitude Training Smile

Quote:Yes, volume is perfect. I really like his methods. I train a bit differently but would have no problem doing it or recommending it.
https://forums.t-nation.com/t/fortitude-training/222358

And you can find here the podcast where CT talk about FT and Scott
https://fitinfoclub.wordpress.com/2016/1...hibaudeau/

Blush
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732mikee (05-11-2017)
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05-10-2017, 10:35 PM
Post: #2
RE: FT approved by CT
(05-10-2017 08:06 PM)Tintin Wrote:
 
Hi guys,

Just a little post to share the good words of Christian Thibaudeau about Fortitude Training Smile

https://forums.t-nation.com/t/fortitude-training/222358

And you can find here the podcast where CT talk about FT and Scott
https://fitinfoclub.wordpress.com/2016/1...hibaudeau/

Blush

AH, thanks, man!!! I'll have to give that podcast a listen.

I talked to Chris up in Canada at the SWIS (symposium) not long after that thread was started. Chris has picked up my book and we chatted about it a bit in e-mail.

Super nice guy, as well as the guys he had along with him up there. Smile

-S

P.S. At first, when I first read this, I thought you might have been referring to CT Fletcher!!! LOL

-Scott

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05-11-2017, 03:36 AM
Post: #3
RE: FT approved by CT
You're welcome biggrin

PS : I dont think there is enough specific arm work for CT Fletcher winkie
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05-11-2017, 08:40 AM
Post: #4
FT approved by CT
God please don't allow someone like Ct fletcher or piano to represent FT. You'd sell millions of copies...to douche bags.


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732mikee (05-11-2017)
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05-12-2017, 03:25 AM
Post: #5
RE: FT approved by CT
(05-11-2017 08:40 AM)phoebeusfenix Wrote:
 
God please don't allow someone like Ct fletcher or piano to represent FT. You'd sell millions of copies...to douche bags.

Smile

I don't think that would happen but I do run into Rich now n' again, as we both live in Tampa. Folks don't know this (I don't think), but he's been around a LOT longer than many know, i.e., was a frequent poster on Chad Nicholl's Muscle Mayhem board in the early 2000's (the he was still competing).

He's always been cool the few times we spoke, including literally today, when we bumped into one another in the airport grocery store after landing in Birmingham (UK) for Bodypower.

I don't know CT, but he's not a too dissimilar story, actually - and I think some of this ranting is an act.

So, I'm not providing any excuses or what have you (I don't follow either too closely ), but thought I'm mention that about Rich. (I've had small talk with dozens of folks about him and never has one - not on time - has someone said a negative thing about thing. That's really amazing, to me at least.)

-S

-Scott

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11-02-2017, 07:15 AM (This post was last modified: 11-02-2017 07:16 AM by Kleen.)
Post: #6
RE: FT approved by CT
I really like Thib's performance and hypertrophy combinations. I was doing a lot of those programs as well as some Zach Evenesh stuff while focusing ons athleticism the last couple years.

Scott, I was actually going to ask you this a little bit ago but this brought it up in my mind. Have you looked into Thib's stuff on Neural Charge Workouts? If not basically they are CNS priming movements that he has people do instead of days off. Supposedly they recharge the CNS as opposed to draining it. He has you do explosive movements for speed with a performance measure being what tells you to stop. Ie if a jump squat you stop the exercise on first set that you don't actually improve performance. So if you jump and on the 3rd set you do not go higher than the 2nd thenyou are done with that movement. I would link up the article he discusses this but I don't remember the rules regarding linking to something on another site.

Anyway he does these to recharge or supercharge the CNS and says these actually stave off overtraining by improving CNS performance. I was wondering if doing something like that on off days might allow for a longer or more intense blasting phase. That or possibly be able to bump up to turbo without it being as hard on the CNS due to the increased frequency.
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11-03-2017, 12:00 AM
Post: #7
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-02-2017 07:15 AM)Kleen Wrote:
 
I really like Thib's performance and hypertrophy combinations. I was doing a lot of those programs as well as some Zach Evenesh stuff while focusing ons athleticism the last couple years.

Scott, I was actually going to ask you this a little bit ago but this brought it up in my mind. Have you looked into Thib's stuff on Neural Charge Workouts? If not basically they are CNS priming movements that he has people do instead of days off. Supposedly they recharge the CNS as opposed to draining it. He has you do explosive movements for speed with a performance measure being what tells you to stop. Ie if a jump squat you stop the exercise on first set that you don't actually improve performance. So if you jump and on the 3rd set you do not go higher than the 2nd thenyou are done with that movement. I would link up the article he discusses this but I don't remember the rules regarding linking to something on another site.

Anyway he does these to recharge or supercharge the CNS and says these actually stave off overtraining by improving CNS performance. I was wondering if doing something like that on off days might allow for a longer or more intense blasting phase. That or possibly be able to bump up to turbo without it being as hard on the CNS due to the increased frequency.


Sure - Post a link!

Chris is a good dude in my experience.

I don't know anything about this particular program. I'd want to see the evidence he has / know the rationale moreso to be able to evaluate this idea.

I would think that if you lowered training volume otherwise, so that those "supercharge" days are not in addition to a training volume from which you are teetering close to overreaching, this could work. But really, that's just changing the nature of your training regime, which isn't anything unusual (not some how supercharging the CNS...)

[Not sure if that's his term, but simply calling something "Supercharging" when it is supposedly rooted in a physiological phenomenon makes me immediately want to question legitimacy. When folks are making up new terms for biological phenonena - and you'll hear this from coaches and people in the industry trying to explain things with what is essentially Bro-science - it suggests they may not have a strong scientific background and/or base of information upon which to stand in that circumstance.)

-S

-Scott

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11-03-2017, 12:33 AM
Post: #8
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-03-2017 12:00 AM)Scott Stevenson Wrote:
 
Sure - Post a link!

Chris is a good dude in my experience.

I don't know anything about this particular program. I'd want to see the evidence he has / know the rationale moreso to be able to evaluate this idea.

I would think that if you lowered training volume otherwise, so that those "supercharge" days are not in addition to a training volume from which you are teetering close to overreaching, this could work. But really, that's just changing the nature of your training regime, which isn't anything unusual (not some how supercharging the CNS...)

[Not sure if that's his term, but simply calling something "Supercharging" when it is supposedly rooted in a physiological phenomenon makes me immediately want to question legitimacy. When folks are making up new terms for biological phenonena - and you'll hear this from coaches and people in the industry trying to explain things with what is essentially Bro-science - it suggests they may not have a strong scientific background and/or base of information upon which to stand in that circumstance.)

-S

I would imagine that supercharging was my own insertion on that one. If he used it then it was in the instructional video because it is not actually in the article. I definitely would not want to add these in if they would be detrimental to the FT methodology but felt good using them before on off days with a 4 day split. It was a different type of program with body parts getting hit twice a week but a little higher volume each training session. So the comparison would be like comparing apples to oranges on how it would work on off days for FT since training is different.

My thought was also two fold, First, does it actually 'charge' the CNS, or does it just activate the CNS more frequently without stressing which keeps it firing more efficiently.
Secondly I hate that when I start using TUT methods on lifts and what not that I tend to get slower. My reaction times just start to go down and reflexes are not as quick. However adding in some explosive movements really geared for speed kept me very explosive while still gaining muscle and being explosive and fast is very important to me.

If maintaining my speed is also important to me then I imagine I probably would not want to try these but once or twice a week and probably keep my self on Tier 1 if also doing them
Here is the link to the article:
https://www.t-nation.com/workouts/neural...e-training
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11-04-2017, 12:36 AM
Post: #9
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-03-2017 12:33 AM)Kleen Wrote:
 
I would imagine that supercharging was my own insertion on that one. If he used it then it was in the instructional video because it is not actually in the article. I definitely would not want to add these in if they would be detrimental to the FT methodology but felt good using them before on off days with a 4 day split. It was a different type of program with body parts getting hit twice a week but a little higher volume each training session. So the comparison would be like comparing apples to oranges on how it would work on off days for FT since training is different.

He just calls it Neural Charge Training to give it a name.

Quote:My thought was also two fold, First, does it actually 'charge' the CNS, or does it just activate the CNS more frequently without stressing which keeps it firing more efficiently.
Secondly I hate that when I start using TUT methods on lifts and what not that I tend to get slower. My reaction times just start to go down and reflexes are not as quick. However adding in some explosive movements really geared for speed kept me very explosive while still gaining muscle and being explosive and fast is very important to me.

I skimmed over the article.

There is no magic here, but if you don't make it seem like there is, few people will read the article.

I can find easily how he sets up a weekly "split" here but this is just the typical way one should / would train with the exercises he lists there to improve explosiveness: avoid metabolic and cardiovascular fatigue so the efforts and performance a maximal. This is just making use of specificity of training.

100m sprinter perform maximum efforts over short distances and train that way.

Marathon runners do the opposite and generally train that way.

There is no charging up of the nervous system (whatever that means) at work here

He note that this training does the following - I'll comment after a dash on each

• Increases insulin sensitivity - exercise doest this generally
• Stimulates the release of anabolic hormones - resistance exercise does this generally.
• Loads more nutrients into the muscle cell - exercise does this generally
• Jumpstarts recovery - perhaps he's referring to the plazma he recommends, but this is a generic statement. Training creates inroads to / slows recovery from any previous workout, but it's also was actually creates the entire "recovery" process in the first place. You could also say that a knife wound jumpstarts wound healing b/c you'd not have wound healing with a wound.
• Enhances work capacity - Training adaptation
• Stimulates further growth - THIS is what is / could be of use here.

On the last point: If this kind of power training means lifting heavier loads when training for hypertrophy (which 3-5 reps will not typically do very well), then there's something to say here. Again, you can't just ADD this extra training in on top of a given regimen and have it "jumpstart" recovery as it will contribute to total training load.

The key to using power movements if one wanted to would be to balance overall training volume and, frankly, probably to periodize them in (as many BB'ers do with periods of powerlifting).

• Prepares the body for the next workout - Generic and pretty much meaningless statement, unless he means that the power training adaptations will carry over to the bodybuilding workouts .



Quote:If maintaining my speed is also important to me then I imagine I probably would not want to try these but once or twice a week and probably keep my self on Tier 1 if also doing them
Here is the link to the article:
https://www.t-nation.com/workouts/neural...e-training

You'd need to balance training load for sure. I'd also MEASURE your speed in some objective way to see if there is an effect. (And frankly is SPEED is what you want, I'd training for specifically whatever that means to you as far as your sense of reaction time (do your really mean reaction time per se?) or what have you.

But yes, if you don't use it, you lose it, so stopping power training will generally mean a loss of whatever power adaptations were elicited by the previous training. Smile

-S

-Scott

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The above and all material posted by Scott Stevenson are Copyright © Scott W. Stevenson and Evlogia QiWorks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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11-04-2017, 02:21 AM
Post: #10
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-04-2017 12:36 AM)Scott Stevenson Wrote:
 
He just calls it Neural Charge Training to give it a name.


I skimmed over the article.

There is no magic here, but if you don't make it seem like there is, few people will read the article.

I can find easily how he sets up a weekly "split" here but this is just the typical way one should / would train with the exercises he lists there to improve explosiveness: avoid metabolic and cardiovascular fatigue so the efforts and performance a maximal. This is just making use of specificity of training.

100m sprinter perform maximum efforts over short distances and train that way.

Marathon runners do the opposite and generally train that way.

There is no charging up of the nervous system (whatever that means) at work here

He note that this training does the following - I'll comment after a dash on each

• Increases insulin sensitivity - exercise doest this generally
• Stimulates the release of anabolic hormones - resistance exercise does this generally.
• Loads more nutrients into the muscle cell - exercise does this generally
• Jumpstarts recovery - perhaps he's referring to the plazma he recommends, but this is a generic statement. Training creates inroads to / slows recovery from any previous workout, but it's also was actually creates the entire "recovery" process in the first place. You could also say that a knife wound jumpstarts wound healing b/c you'd not have wound healing with a wound.
• Enhances work capacity - Training adaptation
• Stimulates further growth - THIS is what is / could be of use here.

On the last point: If this kind of power training means lifting heavier loads when training for hypertrophy (which 3-5 reps will not typically do very well), then there's something to say here. Again, you can't just ADD this extra training in on top of a given regimen and have it "jumpstart" recovery as it will contribute to total training load.

The key to using power movements if one wanted to would be to balance overall training volume and, frankly, probably to periodize them in (as many BB'ers do with periods of powerlifting).

• Prepares the body for the next workout - Generic and pretty much meaningless statement, unless he means that the power training adaptations will carry over to the bodybuilding workouts .




You'd need to balance training load for sure. I'd also MEASURE your speed in some objective way to see if there is an effect. (And frankly is SPEED is what you want, I'd training for specifically whatever that means to you as far as your sense of reaction time (do your really mean reaction time per se?) or what have you.

But yes, if you don't use it, you lose it, so stopping power training will generally mean a loss of whatever power adaptations were elicited by the previous training. Smile

-S

Makes sense and yeah that list he put in there is pretty generic for what most exercise can do. The exercises I did were body weight plyomentrics, so I typically measured via distance covered or height. Like Jump from the same place and track distance, or height jumped. Same with a plyo push up when I had someone else watching. So that was how I "measured" the speed or explosiveness when I did them before.

Part of where the recommendation came from his "Train for your Neuro type" articles. They theorized different Neuro types have different ideal approaches to programming their training. Basically they compared the different physiological characteristics of the neuro / personality types, and what types of training would work better with that type of physiology. By neuro types they are comparing levels of things like high or low Dopamine, Acetylcholine, and or GABA. Things like this. They explain how those factors effect our behavior and personality traits or training preferences and have you use those traits to help you figure out where you fit in the mix.

Anyway in one of the articles he mentions that for some due to the physiology needed more frequent stimulation of the CNS to keep it from degrading due to inactivity while others with different levels of some of those markers do not need that type of frequency to keep their CNS operating at a high level. So this is what that article recommended to do to keep the frequency which for those specific people was supposed to help keep their CNS performing more efficiently.

I think I misconstrued what he was saying to say that it actually charged the CNS, rather than keeping it at it's most efficient level via the increased frequency but lower intensity and volume so it isn't creating a major inroad to recovery. Of course with a name like Neural Charge workout you can see how I misconstrued it...

I would be curious on your thoughts on what they classified at Neuro Types and the types of training recommended. Here is a link to the first article that outlines it a bit if you are interested in seeing what they are talking about and it it has any merit in your opinion.
https://www.t-nation.com/workouts/the-ne...e-workouts

I imagine if I really want to work to maintain speed and explosiveness maybe I can just do some plyometrics for that body part in my warm up which would also double as activation / CNS priming movements. That would probably make much more sense in this situation than a separate workout now that I have reviewed it and the article that referred me to it in the first place.

Thanks for helping me sort that out!!!
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