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FT approved by CT
11-05-2017, 12:41 AM
Post: #11
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-04-2017 02:21 AM)Kleen Wrote:
 
Makes sense and yeah that list he put in there is pretty generic for what most exercise can do. The exercises I did were body weight plyomentrics, so I typically measured via distance covered or height. Like Jump from the same place and track distance, or height jumped. Same with a plyo push up when I had someone else watching. So that was how I "measured" the speed or explosiveness when I did them before.

Makes sense. Smile

Quote:Part of where the recommendation came from his "Train for your Neuro type" articles. They theorized different Neuro types have different ideal approaches to programming their training. Basically they compared the different physiological characteristics of the neuro / personality types, and what types of training would work better with that type of physiology. By neuro types they are comparing levels of things like high or low Dopamine, Acetylcholine, and or GABA. Things like this. They explain how those factors effect our behavior and personality traits or training preferences and have you use those traits to help you figure out where you fit in the mix.

Someone asked me to look into those, too. They were based on a VERY VERY flimsy premise, IMO.

The personality types are based upon the action of drugs on invidduals. See:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2810834/

and

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rob...ZuPR3e8URA

Quote:Anyway in one of the articles he mentions that for some due to the physiology needed more frequent stimulation of the CNS to keep it from degrading due to inactivity while others with different levels of some of those markers do not need that type of frequency to keep their CNS operating at a high level. So this is what that article recommended to do to keep the frequency which for those specific people was supposed to help keep their CNS performing more efficiently.

That idea might just resonate with some personalities, though, which makes for a great selling point.

Confirmation bias is a powerful psychological phenomenon. Smile

Quote:I think I misconstrued what he was saying to say that it actually charged the CNS, rather than keeping it at it's most efficient level via the increased frequency but lower intensity and volume so it isn't creating a major inroad to recovery. Of course with a name like Neural Charge workout you can see how I misconstrued it...

Yes, of course.

The word "efficiency" gets used a lot by bodybuilders, but this is rarely defined. It has a specific meaning (and is contrasted with economy) in exercise physiology, but I really have no idea what is means *specifically* as you use it here. From a physiologist's perspective, you'd have to have some means of measuring this. (I can think of ways it could be done, but I doubt you had these in mind.)

Quote:I would be curious on your thoughts on what they classified at Neuro Types and the types of training recommended. Here is a link to the first article that outlines it a bit if you are interested in seeing what they are talking about and it it has any merit in your opinion.
https://www.t-nation.com/workouts/the-ne...e-workouts

From the first reference above:

"Pharmacological studies that examined the associations between extremes in temperament types and classes of antidepressants that primarily act on certain neurotransmitters or prevent their breakdown have produced highly inconsistent findings (Joyce, Mulder & Cloninger, 1994; Joyce et al., 2004; Nelson & Cloninger, 1995, 1997; Newman et al., 2000; Sato et al., 1999; Tome, Cloninger, Watson & Isaac, 1997). These mixed findings challenge assertions concerning simple one-to-one associations between temperament extremes and neurotramitter functions, as well as the utility of temperament profiles in informing choices among pharmacological interventions. Additionally, in some research, there is an indication that character rather than temperament dimensions better predict response to antidepressant treatment (Sato et al., 1999), which is also inconsistent with Cloninger’s model (Svrakic et al., 2002).

Tests of Cloninger’s (1987a) hypotheses concerning the association of temperament with sensitivity to environmental cues (e.g., to novelty, reward and punishment cues) and responsiveness to such cues (e.g., exploratory pursuit, appetitive approach, passive avoidance) have also yielded mixed findings (Chapman et al., 2003; Corr et al., 1995; Farmer et al., 2003). There are further indications that the associations between TCI temperament dimensions and prototypical stimulus-response profiles are not as simple and straightforward as Cloninger originally proposed (Farmer, Whitehead, & Woolcock, 2007).

Finally, Cloninger’s theory asserts that temperament and character development occur sequentially, with temperament development preceding that of character (Cloninger & Gilligan, 1987). Findings from Constantino et al. (2002), however, indicate that temperament and character dimensions among preschoolers are about equally stable between 30 months to 65 months of age, and that character dimension scores do not significantly correlate with age.

Overall, there is not strong support for the main assumptions of Cloninger’s theory, nor is their solid support for the hypothesized structure of personality traits as measured in several versions of his inventory. Perhaps because of its appealing simplicity and readily testable hypotheses, Cloninger’s theory has frequently served as the foundation for research investigations into personality and psychopathology. Although such investigations have produced many useful findings, it is becoming increasingly clear that the model and the measures used to operationalize its main elements have several significant flaws, and have limited utility in exploring and explaining important processes related to personality and psychopathology."

There are a number of personality

Quote:I imagine if I really want to work to maintain speed and explosiveness maybe I can just do some plyometrics for that body part in my warm up which would also double as activation / CNS priming movements. That would probably make much more sense in this situation than a separate workout now that I have reviewed it and the article that referred me to it in the first place.

Sounds like a plan.

FWIW, for bodybuilding purposes, moving with the greatest power output through your exercises may not be the best course of action. And becoming the biggest / best bodybuilder possible certainly doesn't go hand in hand with becoming the best power athlete, so you're looking at a trade off here either way.

-S

A

-Scott

Thanks for joining my Forum! dog

The above and all material posted by Scott Stevenson are Copyright © Scott W. Stevenson and Evlogia QiWorks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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Integrative Bodybuilding - Integrate Your Potential!
11-07-2017, 02:17 AM
Post: #12
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-05-2017 12:41 AM)Scott Stevenson Wrote:
 
Makes sense. Smile


Someone asked me to look into those, too. They were based on a VERY VERY flimsy premise, IMO.

The personality types are based upon the action of drugs on invidduals. See:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2810834/

and

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Rob...ZuPR3e8URA


That idea might just resonate with some personalities, though, which makes for a great selling point.

Confirmation bias is a powerful psychological phenomenon. Smile


Yes, of course.

The word "efficiency" gets used a lot by bodybuilders, but this is rarely defined. It has a specific meaning (and is contrasted with economy) in exercise physiology, but I really have no idea what is means *specifically* as you use it here. From a physiologist's perspective, you'd have to have some means of measuring this. (I can think of ways it could be done, but I doubt you had these in mind.)


From the first reference above:

"Pharmacological studies that examined the associations between extremes in temperament types and classes of antidepressants that primarily act on certain neurotransmitters or prevent their breakdown have produced highly inconsistent findings (Joyce, Mulder & Cloninger, 1994; Joyce et al., 2004; Nelson & Cloninger, 1995, 1997; Newman et al., 2000; Sato et al., 1999; Tome, Cloninger, Watson & Isaac, 1997). These mixed findings challenge assertions concerning simple one-to-one associations between temperament extremes and neurotramitter functions, as well as the utility of temperament profiles in informing choices among pharmacological interventions. Additionally, in some research, there is an indication that character rather than temperament dimensions better predict response to antidepressant treatment (Sato et al., 1999), which is also inconsistent with Cloninger’s model (Svrakic et al., 2002).

Tests of Cloninger’s (1987a) hypotheses concerning the association of temperament with sensitivity to environmental cues (e.g., to novelty, reward and punishment cues) and responsiveness to such cues (e.g., exploratory pursuit, appetitive approach, passive avoidance) have also yielded mixed findings (Chapman et al., 2003; Corr et al., 1995; Farmer et al., 2003). There are further indications that the associations between TCI temperament dimensions and prototypical stimulus-response profiles are not as simple and straightforward as Cloninger originally proposed (Farmer, Whitehead, & Woolcock, 2007).

Finally, Cloninger’s theory asserts that temperament and character development occur sequentially, with temperament development preceding that of character (Cloninger & Gilligan, 1987). Findings from Constantino et al. (2002), however, indicate that temperament and character dimensions among preschoolers are about equally stable between 30 months to 65 months of age, and that character dimension scores do not significantly correlate with age.

Overall, there is not strong support for the main assumptions of Cloninger’s theory, nor is their solid support for the hypothesized structure of personality traits as measured in several versions of his inventory. Perhaps because of its appealing simplicity and readily testable hypotheses, Cloninger’s theory has frequently served as the foundation for research investigations into personality and psychopathology. Although such investigations have produced many useful findings, it is becoming increasingly clear that the model and the measures used to operationalize its main elements have several significant flaws, and have limited utility in exploring and explaining important processes related to personality and psychopathology."

There are a number of personality


Sounds like a plan.

FWIW, for bodybuilding purposes, moving with the greatest power output through your exercises may not be the best course of action. And becoming the biggest / best bodybuilder possible certainly doesn't go hand in hand with becoming the best power athlete, so you're looking at a trade off here either way.

-S

A

I don't know how to break the response into quote squares like you did so I will just respond in one clump. Smile

As far as the personality stuff I can see how that works out. Basically I think what they did there was take some personality traits and make a program that would be more fun for someone with that type of personality. Which could result in them sticking with it / enjoying the workouts more.

However simply enjoying the type of workout and getting the best results are not always the same thing.


Yeah, as far as the speed goes you are right, and I already know this... I typically like to stay well rounded, or that has been my focus for the last few years. However to do my best at the show, I am going to need to focus purely on hypertrophy, and not worry about the other factors until after the competition.

It's not like speed is a hard thing to retrain, especially for someone who is naturally explosive.
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Integrative Bodybuilding - Integrate Your Potential!
11-08-2017, 12:59 AM
Post: #13
RE: FT approved by CT
(11-07-2017 02:17 AM)Kleen Wrote:
 
I don't know how to break the response into quote squares like you did so I will just respond in one clump. Smile

Select the text you want to quote and then click the "insert quoted text" box button (right most grouping of buttons).

Quote:As far as the personality stuff I can see how that works out. Basically I think what they did there was take some personality traits and make a program that would be more fun for someone with that type of personality. Which could result in them sticking with it / enjoying the workouts more.

Yep!

Quote:However simply enjoying the type of workout and getting the best results are not always the same thing.

Agreed!

Quote:Yeah, as far as the speed goes you are right, and I already know this... I typically like to stay well rounded, or that has been my focus for the last few years. However to do my best at the show, I am going to need to focus purely on hypertrophy, and not worry about the other factors until after the competition.

It's not like speed is a hard thing to retrain, especially for someone who is naturally explosive.

If you're naturally explosive, you've likely not lost much. Smile

-S

-Scott

Thanks for joining my Forum! dog

The above and all material posted by Scott Stevenson are Copyright © Scott W. Stevenson and Evlogia QiWorks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.
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Integrative Bodybuilding - Integrate Your Potential!
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